The Lair of the White Worm 1988 ***

The decline and fall of Ken Russell would make a film in itself; once the enfant terrible of British cinema, he ended up making films in his nursing home. The Lair of the White Worm is a very strange late entry from the end of his peak; the 80’s saw him venture across the pond of the excellent Altered States and the oddball Crimes of Passion; returning to Blighty saw him head back to the literary path with Frankenstein creation story Gothic and this adaptation of Bram Stoker’s The Lair of the White Worm. Both film have enough baroque imagery to qualify as horror films, although the sight of Peter Capaldi pacifying the giant worm with his bagpipes is likely to create sleepless nights with mirth. Capaldi’s Angus Flint is one of a ground of excavators who come across a giant skull on an archaeological dig; could the mysterious Lady Sylvia Marsh (Amanda Donohoe), who seduces boy scouts in her spare time, know anything about the giant worm it suggests? And does Lord James D’Ampton (Hugh Grant) realise that his family have a history of slaying giant beasts? Russell’s use of chroma-key effects to create weird hallucinogenic montages of Bacchanalian tableau is hit or miss, but the cast all seem game for a ludicrous adventure that’s part Dr Who, part Nigel Kneale, and mainly Ken Russell, having fun with the production design by finding worms, snakes and all kinds of visual motifs for his story. The Lair of the White Worm was less than popular on release, but it’s gained a deserved cult following; the star names involved should draw a crowd to streaming services, and even if they don’t want to remember this film, it’s use of classic British mythology gives it a unique, decadent tone.

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The Rewrite 2014 ***

rewriteWriter/director Marc Lawrence is something of an invisible auteur, making a series of popular rom-coms with the likes of Hugh Grant and Sandra Bullock which generally do well, yet his name is unnoticed. The Rewrite is one of his best, pitting Grant’s jaded screenwriter Keith Michaels into the academic snake-pit of an East Coast college. Despite his slovenly manner and non-existent teaching methods, Michaels becomes a hit with his class, and gets to strike romantic sparks with Marisa Tomei. While some of the details of the class are unpersuasive, the atmosphere of the classroom is warm and enjoyable, and as the rain-drops fall on the windows outside, Grant’s wayward teacher is good company in this undemanding comedy with few laughs but more than a little heart.

Florence Foster Jenkins 2016 ***

florencefosterjenkins-17and19thofjuneComing alongside France’s more sophisticated Marguerite, Florence Foster Jenkins found itself in a rare dog-fight of competing ‘films about opera singers who can’t sing’. That Stephen Frears’ film came out on top is no surprise due to the star-power of Meryl Streep, buried under padding but still able to hit the correct bum notes on cue. But the surprises here are the supporting roles, with The Big Bang Theory’s Simon Helberg giving a lovely comic turn as the gauche pianist, and from Hugh Grant as Jenkins’s long-suffering husband; his wildly enthusiastic dancing routine is one of 2016’s more memorable scenes. For Frears, it’s yet another in his series of films about offbeat entrepreneurial double-acts; from Mrs Henderson Presents to My Beautiful Laundrette, he’s carved a niche in capturing the fragile relationships of those bonded by unusual goals.