Bumblebee 2018 ***

bumblebee-2018-001-hailee-steinfeld-bumblebeeHow about a film about a towering yellow robot learning to love The Smiths? That might sound great, but Bumblebee is also a Transformers movie, so you have to sit through a lot of rubbish about Autobots and Decepticons to get to the funny bits. This is the first modern Transformers movie without Michael Bay directing, and they’ve clearly rethought the running time (not three hours long!), the usual sexism, racism and massive dumps of exposition are missing (a female writer!), and the whole film is more of a throwback towards 80’s movies like ET or Mac and Me. Pop star Hailie Steinfeld is the lucky girl who buys a VW Beetle from a scrapyard only to find it has magical powers like Herbie. It’s an Autobot on the run from Decepticons, two muscle cars which also transform into huge robots. Wrestler John Cena leads the army forces trying to get in the way of the big robot battle. Bumblebee is a cute film, not as loud or bombastic as the other Transfomers movies, and actually kind of small and charming in comparison. 80’s music is slathered on, complete with pop-culture references to ALF, The Breakfast Club and somehow, The Smiths.

Advertisements

Gifted 2017 ****

 Cat-rescuing is a noble profession; from Ripley in Alien onwards, it’s become such a cliché that there’s even a screenwriting manual named after the conceit. When Frank Adler (Chris Evans) rescues the cat belonging to his niece Mary (McKenna Grace) towards the end of Mark Webb’s Gifted, it’s a crucial plot-point and a feel-good moment in a slight but affecting film about children, education and family. Mary’s mother is dead by the start of Gifted’s narrative, and Frank has been raising her despite the antipathy of her grandmother Evelyn(Lindsay Duncan).  Once she starts at school, Mary’s gift for maths attracts the attention of her teacher (Jenny Slate), but Frank is reluctant to feed this particular fire, since Mary’s mother was a maths prodigy who ultimately killed herself. Gifted plays with a tug-of-war between Frank and Evelyn that’s settled in a very satisfactory way; throw in support from Octavia Spencer, and Gifted is a strong package of thoughtful entertainment for those seeking a restrained slice of drama.

Mary Poppins Returns 2018 ****

Reviving a beloved fifty-year old property was always going to be a tough ask for Disney; Mary Poppins Returns succeeds primarily because Emily Blunt is perfect casting to take over the umbrella from Julie Andrews; there’s a mix of starch and sweetness here that’s ideal to recapture the character, although Blunt’s Poppins is notably different, particularly in a sexualised way. Rob Marshall’s film doubles down on the musical-hall styling of the original, but the fresh emphasis on innuendo; Blunt’s performance of The Cover is Not The Book shifts somewhat towards Sally Bowles in Cabaret. Otherwise, there’s a familiar mix of 2D animation, sentiment, and of course every child loves a trenchant analysis of the banking system. Nefarious disaster capitalist Colin Firth has the Banks family (Ben Wishaw and Emily Mortimer) over a barrel unless they can recover precious deeds. Mary Poppins Returns scrupulously adheres to the original film, right down to longeuers, general over-length and a lack of pace. But the music is fine, and Blunt revitalises the character for a new generation of nanny-seeking children of all ages.

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children 2016 ***

miss-peregrine-640x370Hailed as a return to form for Tim Burton, Miss Peregrine is more like a return to familiar ground; Burton’s obsessions are never buried deep in his work, and it’s not like he was dampening his style down for Big Eyes, Frankenweenie or Dark Shadows. But this YA adaptation of the book by Ransom Riggs has a more confident and epic scope as it relates the story of a young boy Jake (Asa Butterfield) who is won over by the many gifted children of Miss Peregrine (Evan Green). There’s some complex, time-shifting story-telling here, and a strange visual atmosphere involving the British coastal resort of Blackpool. A strong supporting cast including Rupert Everett and Judi Dench don’t get to contribute much, but Green is as good as ever, and Burton seems to have remembered what his audience like to see; channeling his off-kilter style into a compelling narrative.

The Maze Runner 2014 ***

THE MAZE RUNNERA breezy take on James Dashner’s Young Adult novel, The Maze Runner is a sci-fi drama that racks up a decent amount of tension around an abstract idea. Thomas (Dylan O’Brian) wakes up to find himself in a community of teenagers, whose only exit from their woodlands camp it through a maze populated by large, alien beasts. Thomas battles to be recognised as a leader in a volatile group including Will Poulter and Thomas Brodie-Sangster, and the scenes in The Maze are well-staged and pretty graphic for young audiences. The finals is disappointing in that it sets up a franchise in a rather obviously open-ended way, but the high production values of Wes Ball’s film make it a cut above most studio product for kids.

Little Children 2006 ****

image

Writer/director Todd Field followed up In The Bedroom with an equally dark but just as compelling drama, featuring Kate Winslet as Massachusetts mother Sarah who embarks on clandestine afternoon meetings with Brad (Patrick Wilson). Their initially chaste meetings, while their children play at a local park, gives way to a torrid romance, despite their family ties, and engenders a secret that affects the way they see the community around them. That disaffection becomes important as Brad’s friend Larry is suspicious of local outcast Ronnie (Jackie Earle Haley), who lives with his mother and has a complex set of mental health issues relation to women and young girls in particular. How the community treat Ronnie becomes mixed up with Sarah and Brad’s covert affair, and final few scenes of Little Children are intense and powerful as deception leads to consequences. Little Children is melodramatic at times, but the 134 minute length is justified by the eloquent way that Field draws out the mores of the suburban community, and engenders sympathy for Sarah and Brad and their fight against the common denominator of loveless marriages. A woman’s picture in the old style, Little Children is an accomplished adult drama.

http://www.amazon.com/Little-Children-Kate-Winslet/dp/B003OPYOR8/ref=sr_1_1_ha?s=instant-video&ie=UTF8&qid=1399799087&sr=1-1&keywords=little+children

I Wish 2011 ***

I-Wish-2011-Movie-Image-2-e1321199672970

Writer/director Hirokazu Koreeda scored an international sleeper with this charming film about wishes and dreams in a decidedly modern world. Koichi (Koki Maeda) has lost touch with his brother due to the separation of his parents; when a new bullet-train network in Japan is unveiled, he is told that the precise moment when two trains pass each other is the moment that dreams can come true; he enlists a group of friends to make the trek to the appointed spot in the hope that he can reunite his family. Whimsical, yet pragmatic, I Wish is a realistic fantasy of family life and brotherhood, a Stand By Me for the 21st century.